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GEOMETRY: SPATIAL SENSE AND MEASUREMENT
For many adults, geometry is one math topic that immediately makes sense to them and gives them confidence in their ability to learn. It is also true, however, that many adults associate geometry, like algebra, with failure. Measurement, a foundation skill for geometry, is also an essential life skill, one that adults use in many different but familiar contexts.

Measurement is not an end in itself. It is a tool used in many contexts; home, work, and community. We measure many different attributes of physical objects and time in many different ways in many different contexts. Measurement is essential to our sense of ourselves and our orientation to the world. Because measurement is used so often and in so many contexts, many learners have great confidence in their measurement skills. For ESL learners, teaching measurement is very important as a cross-cultural component of mathematics and second language learning, since many of these learners have use the metric measurement system much more than the U.S. system. Measurement skills can be critically important. Time management is another critical measurement skill.

Some adult learners identify geometry with failure. Other learners recognize their excellent everyday skills in geometry, although they may or may not use the term "geometry" in relation to these skills. Some adult learners don't see geometry as useful, however, geometry is and can be related to all aspects of life: home, school, work and community. Geometry and spatial sense can be used to describe the physical world.

IMPLICATIONS FOR LEARNING AND TEACHING

We must use exact and estimated measurements to describe and compare phenomena to increase the understanding of the structure, concepts and process of measurement. Despite the fact that competence in measurement is vital, some adult learners have difficulty selecting and determining appropriate units of measure as well as appropriate tools of measurement. Concrete activities with non-standard and standards units help learners develop an understanding of the many measurable attributes of physical objects (length, time, temperature, capacity, weight, mass, area, volume, and angle). This is the natural way of building a vocabulary for measurement, and for comprehension of what it means to measure.

We must address the impact of measurement skills on self-efficacy and self-reliance. Math is everywhere and to be independent and survive on a limited budget one needs to be able to do things oneself and find the best values along the way.

Measurement skills should be extended to concepts areas such as volume, proportion, and problem solving.

We must increase the awareness of acceptable tolerances (margins and upper and lower limits) and the consequences of being within and outside of these tolerances. In the workplace, everything is measured. Someone has to understand what upper and lower limits are, and how to input data. Much is computerized but the results are only as good as the information inputted.

The place to start is the learner's strengths; instruction must be practical and useful for learners to overcome their fears regarding geometry. Opposites must be provided for learners to make connections between instruction and real-life situations common to their lives.

Finally, it is necessary to focus on hands-on problem solving and to give special attention to developing spatial sense in order for learners to develop an understanding of geometric principles. Spatial reasoning includes not only geometry, but measurement and the ability to visualize. It is often the visual and concrete models that can help people understand and learn what we want to teach about number and statistics. We must realize that this kind of reasoning, this part of mathematics, often helps students who have talents in this direction realize and accept that they do have. mathematical potential.



Title: Celsius Temperature

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Celsius Temperature Worksheet
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Estimated
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1. On a tabletop
2. On a windowsill
3. In the refrigerator
4. In the freezer
5. In your shirt pocket
6. Outside
7. On the wall
8. Near a heat source



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An Apple for the Teacher Worksheet
Volume

Weight



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Hands Down Worksheet
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Liquid Measure Graph

Pint Quart Gallon
Estimate    Actual Estimate    Actual Estimate    Actual 
Cups
Pints
Quarts
Gallons



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QUESTIONS FOR "INCHES, FEET, YARDS"



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ACTIVITY QUESTIONS FOR "HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW?

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